It’s exactly 8 days until Election Day 2014. All the fundraising is done. The battle for positioning is over for the most part. The attacks, counterattacks, and defenses have mostly been launched.

Now there’s only time left for two things: convince persuadable voters that you’re the best candidate for the job, and get your supporters to the polls.

GOTV with Intermarkets bannerGOTV

The Intermarkets portfolio is the best place to reach both of these audiences. Our exclusive publishers—like The Drudge Report, CNS News, the Media Research Center, and others—combine for over 28 million unique users every month.

These are the most active, politically astute audiences online. These are the community leaders, influencers, and activists you need on your side to win.

Our exclusive portfolio is a crucial part of winning GOTV plans, but to win, candidates need more than just their base.

View our portfolio here.

Persuadable Voters

Campaigns don’t stop with the base, and the Intermarkets portfolio has very strong reach into right-leaning, independent, and center-left voters. The Drudge Report and our other exclusive publishers, like RefDesk, The Grocery Game, and Creators.com are serious hubs for soft Democrats and independent swing voters.

Our huge audience can be targeted to millions of visitors of all political persuasions.

We are the #1 referrer to the top news and political outlets. The New York Times, The Washington Post, and nearly every other national news outlet. These are the voters you need to convince to win.

Putting Your GOTV in Context

Context is crucial. Your ads are more powerful when they compliment the news or content your audience is already reading. They can be run while voters are reading their political news or searching for info that may sway their vote between now and Election Day.

We can serve your foreign policy ad to users reading about ISIS or Putin, your jobs pitch to families worried about the economy, or your ObamaCare hit to the voters reading the latest healthcare news.

This is it. You can’t afford to leave any votes on the table.

viewServices

Richard Nixon Campaign Sign

The principles of campaigning don’t change. The means do. Adding digital to a campaign’s arsenal—or beefing up an outdated system—can make candidates more visible and more responsive to the people they want to represent.

Be More Places at the Same Time with Smart Targeting

Candidates will still need to press the flesh at the grocery store. When it comes to politics, people truly feel the need to “know” a potential representative, and consider them genuine. Digital campaigning can provide a complimentary addition to both getting to know a candidate as well as increasing “touches” with voters.

Now, to reach voters, candidates can be at several grocery stores instead of just one. In fact, candidates don’t even have to be at the grocery store. They can be at the manufacturer. Or the union hall. Or the transportation company. To put it another way, candidates can be almost anywhere voters are: online. And they need to be.

Consider that Americans spend 11 hours per day with digital media. You have a lot more time and more opportunities to reach voters digitally than you do running into the right people at the grocery store.

Think about this: in an increasingly mobile age, candidates won’t have to fly around the state, rushing through the meager 20 minutes they get at each county fair. Now they can be at every county fair, spreading the word about their agriculture policies.

Creating and deploying cost-efficient, effective digital ads is the new retail politics. Candidates can give their specific, relevant message to voters who are engaging in a digital version of the real-world, retail situation of days gone past.

That’s how you press the flesh in 2014.

The Personal Connection

Candidates can run video ads that provide the same eye-contact, sincerity, and emotional appeal of a TV ad for a fraction of the cost. Better yet—they can associate their message with content the voter is already consuming.

Of course, interaction is diminished in any virtual situation. But there’s no reason a creative campaign team can’t come up with engaging ways to educate voters about a candidate or her opponent.

A smart trigger campaign combined with a volunteer rewards system could actually increase the amount of “face-time” a voter gets with a campaign, and by proxy, the candidate. The Internet doesn’t have office hours, and it doesn’t get tired.

viewServices

Keyboard control button

Effectively Control Your Message

You already know digital ad spending will continue to grow. You know it’s important. In politics, control of your message and your image is crucial, to say the least.

In the digital space, you can tailor your communication to do both, with more control than ever before.

The advantages of digital media over traditional and mass-media are legion. Whereas most people consider TV ads intrusive breaks in their desired content, a well-placed banner ad can be a welcome source of additional information. Instead of subtracting from the consumer’s experience, well-placed digital ads can be complimentary.

The same goes for phone calls. Or that direct mail piece that gets thrown in the trash without a sideways glance. But let’s say you’re a political candidate running in Wisconsin. Digital advertising allows you to show an ad about your opposition to ObamaCare to young doctors checking out medical websites in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin. You could direct them to your policy page outlining your solutions.

Or maybe you want to remind voters that food prices are rising faster than inflation. You can put your message on mobile, and target young women trying to beat the rising cost of beef.

Efficiently Control Your Message

Let’s say your opponent drops $200,000 on a TV ad attacking you. Maybe they’re only reaching a small segment of people whose opinion can be swayed, and a large segment of people who weren’t going to be vulnerable to that message.

You don’t have to spend your own $200,000 to respond, with the same possibility that your message won’t move the needle. You can get together with your pollster and spend $5,000 reaching out to demographics you need to sway. You can respond smarter, as well as cheaper. And unlike TV, you know instantly how many people engaged with your ad, and what kind of ROI it garnered.

Winning a political campaign, especially in big races, is about bringing together a coalition of voters, influencers, and communities who may disagree with one another on big policy issues. Instead of beating everyone over the head with huge TV buys that may offend some of your supporters, target your ads online.

All the targeting advantages of traditional snail-mail campaigns are combined with near-instant, real-time efficiency online. This is a new era of messaging.

viewServices

Hundreds of millions of dollars will be spent by “outside” groups this political cycle.

When you add in candidates and committees, we’re talking billions. Learn more about how online ads surpass broadcast TV here.

And just like everything else, political campaigns are won and lost at the margins. Increasingly, those margins will come in the digital space. InTheCapital relays research showing a major increase in digital spending by candidates and other electioneers.

While TV spending will also increase, traditional viewership is down. Spending on robo-calls and direct mail is not expected to grow. That means the battleground for eyes and ears will take place somewhere else – banners, social, pre-roll, video ads, email, and other places we haven’t even thought of yet.

Digital Media is Not Mass-Media

Everyone knows Team Obama crushed digital in 2008 and 2012. Particularly their ability to get promoters to do their work for them. Think about it: instead of talking to one voter at a time over the phone, a campaign could get 10 supporters to share their ad or materials with 10 of their friends each on social media. Talk about ROI. It’s a process the libertarian group FreedomWorks calls “digital door-knocking.”

But it’s not just that, it’s the ability to micro-target. It’s the ability to get a tailored message that will move specific people on a specific issue at a specific time through a specific medium. Everything can be customized. Effectiveness can be tracked down to the penny. It’s not just more effective, it’s more accountable.

Has your opponent slammed you on TV? You can respond to their buckshot tactic with laser-focused responses in key demographics. Is your opponent already targeting you in specific subsets? Follow them and target these viewers with your defense or counter.

And don’t think the Obama campaigns were a fluke because of their youth support. 71% of online adults use Facebook. 49% of adults over 65 use social media. These numbers will continue to grow as more retailers and services expand their online reach.

Campaigns need to follow suit.

viewServices

Like we’ve said before, the 2014 election is a prettttty big deal. It will decide which party controls Congress, and significantly set the stage for the 2016 Presidential Election. That’s why it’s more important now than ever to break the mold and use today’s innovative digital tools to give your campaign the edge it needs to win.

Social media will prove to be an even more crucial tool for political campaigns in 2014 than for campaigns back in 2008 and 2012. Social media is a key source of voter information. Social media is one of the major activities on mobile devices. And social media is a great way to connect with voters on a personal level.

If you’re just getting started (or you’re in over your head!), we’ve put together this list of 7 best practices for social media and political campaigns to get you started. We hope you enjoy!

Consistency is key.

The number one rule of social media is to be consistent. By this, we don’t mean “keep doing the same thing”—you should always be experimenting with new trends, features, and strategies. Consistency is most important when talking about frequency. Your social media followers will expect you to tweet, blog, or post on a consistent basis—and if you don’t, they’ll go listen to someone who does.

No Ghost Towns

If you join a network, be prepared to be active on it. This is the corollary to consistency being key. It’s important, when choosing social media platforms (and there as SO MANY to choose from), to be picky about where you put your efforts. You don’t want to overextend yourself, or start using a platform only to drop it a few weeks later. That’s wasted effort, and social media is all about the long game—you’re building a relationship with your audience, and a relationship takes time.

Each Platform Has a Distinct Language—Learn to Speak It!

One of the most common social media mistakes people make it sharing the same message in the same way across all the social media platforms. The platforms are different—from the reasons people use them to the way they use them. Understanding each platform’s subtleties is the first step to creating messages that will resonate with your audience. You can find a good breakdown of the “Big Four” (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Flickr) here, although some would argue that Instagram has overtaken Flickr in relevancy. Other important networks to consider are LinkedIn (especially for campaigns that focus on business issues), Pinterest (especially good for reaching women and people in the education space), and Google + (for reaching people in the tech space and for SEO purposes).

Listen to Your Audience

Have you ever heard the old adage, “Listen twice as much as you speak”? This is still true in social media! Social media shouldn’t be a bullhorn you use to blare your message out at the world—it’s more like a ticket to an event where you have the chance to connect with your voters, donors, and supporters on a one-on-one basis. Setting up a social listening strategy can help you to keep abreast of what’s already being said about you, participate in the conversations that matter, and gauge the temperature of your audience to better direct your publishing strategy.

Use Social Advertising to Expand Your Reach

Another title of this section could have been, “Social advertising isn’t cheating! It’s using your resources wisely.” As forces like the Facebook algorithm change and increased competition have made it harder to connect with an audience organically, social advertising has become a viable way of drawing in audiences when you want them to take a specific action. And that’s the main “best practice” with social advertising—only employ it when there’s a specific action you’re prompting users to take (i.e. “Donate now!” or “Tell your friends to go vote today!”). Social ads have actually been proven to make or break an election—learn how to use them in your favor!

A Picture’s Worth a Thousand Words

Social media platforms are becoming increasingly visual, and your posts should follow suit. Social media is a war of attention, and a beautiful photograph or an informative graphic is a great way of winning the battle for your audience. Even on Twitter, the wordiest of the platforms, tweets with images see a significant improvement in clicks, retweets, and conversions. And you don’t have to have an in-house designer to participate (thought it doesn’t hurt!). There are lots of online tools, many of them free, to easily create engaging graphics—check out 14 of them here.

Keep Learning!

The most important guideline of all! Social media changes fast, and what’s in this week could be out next week. There are always new platforms popping up, and old platforms are constantly evolving. One of the best ways to keep on top of this is to follow leaders in the space—you can find many of them on Twitter, or by searching for social media best practices and seeing which names keep popping up. Also make sure to keep and monitor a list of other campaigns that are doing social media well—when they change course, you’ll know to reexamine your own approach.

viewServices

In 2013, for the first time ever, Internet ad revenues surpassed those of broadcast television. While television as a whole still commands more eyeballs, this milestone marks a decisive shift in the realm of video advertising. The audience for online advertising is skyrocketing, with the amount of the U.S. population streaming their content up 58% from 38% five years ago (IAB/Nielsen).

“Leveraging the large reach of TV in combination with the standalone impact and amplifying effect of online video makes for a successful strategy.”

—Dave Kaplan, Senior Vice President, Product Leadership at Nielsen IAG

Since political campaigns traditionally rely heavily on television advertising, this shift also raises the question: could you be getting more bang for your buck with online video?

TV Costs Soar While Viewership Drops

As reported by Ad Age’s Jack Neff, television advertising’s “cost per gross rating point (GRP) to reach 18-to-49-year-olds has quadrupled in the past two decades, according to Horizon Media,” even as its reach has been “diluted by the proliferation of other media.” Just this past year, broadcast and cable television’s cost per milli (CPMs) were up 5% (AdWeek).

At the same time that TV’s cost has quadrupled, broadcast TV’s audience ratings have been cut in half in the past decade. According to RMG Networks, “The networks are in a viewership free fall, yet they’re charging marketers more than ever.”

Shifting Dollars to Digital Increases Reach, Decreases Spend

In an IAB study conducted by Nielsen, researchers measured what would happen when dollars were reallocated to digital. To benchmark how moving dollars from TV ad budgets would affect reach and costs, the study examined 18 real TV schedules across key
advertiser verticals. They found that a 15% budget shift increased reach by 6.2% while lowering costs by 6.8%.

Video ads tended to reach harder-to-hit verticals like adults age 18-34 and light TV viewers. Additionally, those who saw the ads on both platform were much more likely to respond, because…

People Remember Online Ads

In a joint study, Microsoft and Nielsen IAG conducted research to determine the effectiveness of ads based on four key brand impact metrics: ad recall, brand recall, message recall, and likeability. Astoundingly, the online video ads outperformed the TV ads on every single metric (Tweet this!).

onlinevstvblog

 

They concluded that the online video viewers’ engagement could be attributed to their viewing environment; mainly, “the oft-required active mouse-clicking to initiate and continue content,” the “reduced ad clutter,” and the inability to easily skip content altogether (like you can do with a DVR).

Better Together: Online Ads Play Nice with TV Ads

The Microsoft/Nielsen IAG study didn’t end there. They also tested how using a dual-platform strategy affected the metrics—and found that a combined strategy amplified brand lift across every major metric:

The Future of Video

The younger generations continues to grow their digital consumption, pointing to a pattern that may hold for years to come. As a society, the ways we digest content are changing, and it’s important to change advertising tactics to keep up with this shift.

As online streaming grows, we’ll probably continue to see the viewership shift online. We want to know—will your campaign strategy shift with it? Let’s talk it out in the comments section.

viewServices

Cross-channel marketing. This phrase is on the minds of many as marketing moves away from the massive “pushes” of the past and toward a more customer-centric approach. Experian’s 2014 Digital Marketer Report showed that 80% of marketers worldwide plan to run cross-channel marketing campaigns in 2014 (Tweet this!). But what is cross-channel marketing, and how can it help you more efficiently reach voters, donors, and volunteers?

Novelty No More

Cross-channel marketing isn’t so much a revolutionary strategy as it is a response to the technological revolution already occurring in all of our lives. Mobile advertising alone has completely changed the game, with Americans spending an average 2.5 hours each day on their smartphones and tablets. 1 in 7 people worldwide now use smartphones, and 1 in 4 online searches are conducted on mobile devices.

This changing technological landscape has, in turn, changed audiences’ expectations. Whereas dynamic content was once a pleasant surprise, it is now an expected convenience:

“Today, [a] customer expects to seamlessly navigate across a growing array of channels and be met at every step of the way with messaging and offers tailored to his or her unique relationship with that brand. Simply put, the customer expects convenience.

—Experian 2014

Tweet this!

Sewing Up the Seams

The only way to offer that desired seamless experience is to unify marketing across multiple channels and devices, creating a cross-channel or omni-channel experience. It’s important to note that cross-channel is not the same as multi-channel—in fact, multi-channel is merely a part of the cross-channel campaign:

“Multi-channel is an operational view—how you allow the customer to complete transactions in each channel. Omni-channel, however, is viewing the experience through the eyes of your customer, orchestrating the customer experience across all channels so that it is seamless, integrated, and consistent … Simply put, omni-channel is multi-channel done right!”

—John Bowden (Marketo Blog)

In short, every facet of the campaign should feel consistent and complimentary across every device—as if coming from a single, recognizable voice. That’s a tall order!

The Customer-Centric Campaign

It’s obvious why this approach is important to the retail customer, but is this lofty marketing ideal really beneficial to the average political campaign? Unequivocally, yes. To reach the digital voter, you must THINK like the digital voter. That voter lives in the same hyper-connected, digital world as the retail customer, and thus has the same expectations for messaging. In a 2013 article on ending the political “turf war,” Wayne Johnson voiced the need this way:

“In retail marketing … there must be a continuity of message and experience.  It’s no less true for a campaign.  While we, of course, target different voter segments, there still needs to be an integrated approach to messaging, as well as messengers, because every voter is getting information about our campaign from more than one source.”

—Wayne Johnson

Next Steps

Cross-channel marketing is the common thread that runs throughout 2014’s top political advertising best practices. DMPs, audience targeting, and the like all do well separately, but it’s when they’re brought together under a single strategy that they really shine. Here are some next steps to help you in integrating your own campaign efforts across multiple channels:

1. Unify the data with a data management platform (DMP).

2. Segment your audience for targeting across multiple devices.

3. Map out what messaging should reach voters at each stage of the campaign.

4. Listen and respond on appropriate channels.

5. Measure everything and optimize accordingly.

viewServices

We talked last week about the first step to any voter targeting campaign—wrangling the data! Using a data management platform to match online “cookies” to real-life voters (and their voter histories) is paramount to a successful targeting campaign.

This week, we’re talking about how to target your audience once you’ve found it—and what insights there are to gain along the way.

1. Be Specific

People are sometimes creeped out surprised by how detailed targeting can be. The truth is, there are mountains of data being collected, and data mining allows us to target by a lot of different factors! Using the Electoral roll, voter ID database, and the data that websites themselves can collect, you can target by…

  • Party affiliation
  • Propensity to vote
  • Charitable or political contribution history
  • Geographic location
  • Gender
  • Ethnicity
  • Age
  • Education level
  • Income

Basically—you name it, we can probably target it.

2. But not TOO specific.

Targeting is important, but so is scale! A rookie targeting mistake is to get TOO granular with your audience segmentations and end up messaging an audience of ten. Make your online advertising or email marketing campaign count! If your campaign is only targeting 35-year-old bankers who love dogs and hate grilled cheese sandwiches, you’re not going to be getting the scale your campaign needs to succeed. Especially since NO ONE hates grilled cheese sandwiches. Don’t target to an audience of zero!

3. Define your goals.

Before even embarking on a targeting campaign, be honest with yourself about what your movement is looking to gain. Are you looking to raise funds quickly? Build an opt-in email list? Motivate your supporters to go out and vote? Knowing what you want is crucial to defining your key performance indicators (KPIs), which are the best method to measure (and subsequently achieve) a high return on investment (ROI). Like they say, if you don’t know where you’re going, any road will take you there. The reverse is true too—decide where you want to go, and the road to get there becomes more clear.

4. Start early!

This ClickZ article on the targeting puts it this way: “Plant your targeting garden long before you get hungry.” Like we discussed in this blog post on using DMPs, listening to your audience is an important part of any targeting strategy. We’ve often gotten halfway into a campaign only to realize that part of our target audience is clicking and converting at a much higher rate than the other half. Realizing that early on allows you to quickly optimize your campaign to target your most engaged audience. Optimization helps you save money and reach your goals faster—who doesn’t need that?

5. Invest in voter targeting.

This may seem like the “duh” part of this list—after all, you’re reading this article, aren’t you?—but it’s actually important to keep in mind that just because the cost of online advertising may be slightly higher with targeting, doesn’t mean you’re not getting your money’s worth.

Take, for example, a campaign we at Intermarkets did to target Christian youth in Arizona through online advertising. The goal of the campaign was to identify potential supporters for local candidates whose platforms were based on Christian values.

We ran two placements: one ran untargeted ads on Christian music and lifestyle websites, while the other targeted ads to identified Christians or people interested in Christian music across the web.

While the targeted placement cost per milli (CPM) was 9% more than the direct placements, the targeted ads garnered a 66% better clickthrough rate (CTR), achieving significant returns for the grassroots organization.

Have you found success with voter targeting?

We’d love to hear what your personal experience has been with targeting your online advertising in the comments section below. Or, if you’d like to get started with voter targeting, but aren’t sure which road to take, contact one of our helpful representatives, and we’d be happy to help you out.

viewServices

The Honey Badger’s Guide to Winning

ICYMI: This part three of our 2014 Political Series. Don’t miss part one and part two!

There’s a famous quote in advertising: “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is, I don’t know which half.” As an industry, we’re closer than ever before to solving this age-old problem. With mountains of digital data at our disposal, we can finally know “which half” is which—and optimize the campaign to eliminate waste and increase ROI.

The real challenge, now, is how to tame that mountain of data.

What is a DMP anyway?

First, what is a DMP? A Data Management Platform (DMP) is simply a piece of software that collects, organizes, and stores data in a way that allows users to draw useful insights and take meaningful actions. DMPs also work hand-in-hand with Demand Side Platforms (DSPs) to intelligently target ads to voter segments.

Since DMPs have the ability to match offline and online data, they are the perfect solution to the political campaign’s biggest challenge: integrating data across channels for cohesive messaging.

Matchmaking Made Simple

There are three main types of offline-online “matches” used in campaigns:

1. True 1:1 Match

This is the best way to ensure that you’ve found the exact online persona that you’re looking for. This match is made when all the data points match up with the online profile. Because of the high level of specificity, a 1:1 match search will generally be about 30-40% successful.

2. “Soft” Match

Because information found offline and online can sometimes differ even for the same person, a number of match campaigns will instead rely on “soft” matches. Basically, rather than five of five data points matching up exactly, a “soft” match will line up along three or four of the desired data points. The idea is the the online persona is highly likely to be the real life person desired, but not 100% guaranteed.

3. Postal Address Match

This least specific form of matching uses IP addresses to make inferences on a person based on what one knows about their neighbors. While not always helpful to guess things like party affiliation, this matching strategy can prove quite accurate when looking at attributes like household income or net worth.

However, one of the best ways to increase offline-online matches is to match based on email addresses. As Dave Hendricks pointed out in a recent ClickZ article, email addresses are unique, persistent, and represent real people online. The more email addresses in your database, the better set up you are to target those people wherever they go online.

Knowledge Is Power

Our CBDO Mike Snow put it best recently at the MediaPost Marketing Politics panel, “Learning the New ABCs of Data” :

The first step to any sort of online targeting is knowing who your best audience is and what message they respond best to. With a DMP, you can…

  • Measure your organic traffic for a barometer of who your target voters really are
  • Zero in on your target voters’ passions—which issues really fire them up?
  • Define audiences for finely tuned, targeted messages

With this kind of online listening, you gain an understanding of your audience that you just can’t glean from a TV commercial. Banner and email advertising are often thought of as great strategies for fundraising (and they are!), but this kind of intent listening can do more than drive dollars. It can drive decisions.

The Legend of the “Honey Badger”

Going into the special election for Florida’s 13th district House seat last week, Republican David Jolly’s chances were looking grim. John Rogers, the deputy political director at the National Republican Congressional Committee, told Advertising Age, “Projections a few weeks out showed that we were losing absentees by an amount we didn’t like and that we needed to make a change.”

Using voter file information and a lean “Honey Badger” database, the NRCC’s data team developed analytical models to determine which voters were most likely to cast absentee ballots. Based on these insights, the NRCC’s independent expenditure campaign group launched VoteEarlyFlorida.com to make the absentee voting process as easy as possibly.

Representative Jolly won the election with 48.4% of the vote, compared to his Democrat competitor Alex Sink’s 46.55%. What’s even more impressive is the proof that the team’s absentee ballot strategy worked: registered Republicans submitted 54,184 absentee ballots compared to registered Democrats’ 48,177.

Where Do I Start?

While large-scale operations like presidential campaigns benefit greatly from contracting and using their own personal DMP, a great way for most campaigns to get started is by working with a third-party company that understands how to optimize DMP use. The benefits of doing it this way are multi-fold. There is no learning curve because a third-party company, like Intermarkets, already has the expertise necessary to seamlessly integrate a campaign’s own data with trusted third-party sources and use it to make actionable insights.

If you’re interested in learning more about how a DMP can help your specific campaign, we’d love to chat—reach out to us here. One of the most important things to remember about using a DMP is to start early. The key to eliminating waste and boosting ROI lies in learning as much about your target audience as early as possible.

viewServices

ICMYI: You can find part one of the series here.

Whether you’re reading this from Madison Avenue or Pennsylvania Avenue, your ultimate marketing goal is probably the same—get people to take action. The trade secrets that brand advertisers use to make behemoths like Coca-Cola and Apple into household names are secrets no longer. As Election Day approaches, you can use the same branding and marketing strategies as the top advertisers and agencies to propel your political campaign or cause to victory.

Here are six simple steps to help you implement Madison Ave strategies for political campaigns:

1. Set clear goals.

The big brands know that before you can measure success, you have to define it. While direct response techniques work well early on, branding and persuasion become more important as Election Day approaches. As your campaign goals change, so should your advertising strategy. Market saturation through ad network inventory may be perfect for mobilizing voters before Election Day, while site-specific rich media ads work better to emphasize your candidate’s unique value. Your goals will then inform your success metrics. For instance, while click-through rates are an important gauge in direct response campaigns, a branding campaign may instead measure success by increases in share of voice or offline action.

2. Reach the right people.

Did you know that the typical web user is served 1,707 banner ads per month? In such an ad-saturated environment, the best way to attract the support you need is to micro-target ads, focusing on conversion by speaking to specific voter groups on the subjects that matter to them. Presuming you already know who you want to speak to, today’s targeting technology can provide the where and how. Using non-personally identifiable information, advanced algorithms can match offline voting and donating behaviors to online buying and reading behaviors to help you find and understand your target audience.

3. Listen to your audience.

The key to persuasion isn’t so much talking as it is listening. With Intermarkets’ advanced web tools, you can gather information on your users’ online behaviors and preferences, empowering you to tailor your message and strategy. For example, if all your conversions are coming from one website, you can optimize your campaign to only run on that website or other websites like it. Using a conversion pixel, you can also exclude users who have already signed up for your email list from being asked to sign up again. Audience targeting can even help you reach outside your base by discovering “look-alike” voters based on their behavioral and demographic profiles.

4. Understand inventory types.

Different types of ad inventory serve different purposes, so it’s important to have a good mix in any successful display campaign. The pros of direct buys are easy—when you work with the publisher directly, you can enjoy premium spots, guaranteed placement, and rapid response messaging. Quickly capitalize on a speech’s success or spotlight an opponent’s misstep—all before the next news cycle.  Another important type of inventory is remnant. Normally bought through ad networks or exchanges, remnant inventory can provide better market saturation and a lower dollar return. When combined with programmatic buying, remnant inventory can also target voters and “look-alikes” wherever they go online.

5. Think beyond the standard banner ad.

Static ads are just the beginning of what you can do with digital advertising. As Election Day approaches, TV and video inventory dwindles, and quality, standout digital advertising experiences can make or break a campaign. Rising Star ad units like the Billboard or the Pushdown provide large, interactive canvases that support TV assets, forms, and multiple calls to action. Users can expand an ad to see more content, play video, fill out a contact form, or even share your ad on Twitter and Facebook—all without leaving the page of origin. Plus, Rising Star ad units are a proven way to improve your ad interactions. In recent studies, the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) found that Rising Star units performed nearly 3x better than standard units in universal interaction rate. At Intermarkets, we’ve seen these units increase interaction rates up to 27.1%—6x that of standard units and almost 3x that of Rising Star ads trafficked through other channels.

6. Don’t underestimate the power of ad-serving technology.

Ad delivery technology is one of the most overlooked aspects of online advertising, yet how an ad is served can determine whether your ads get noticed. Box out the competition on key sites with an ad “roadblock,” or use ad pairings for persuasion. As a part of the memorable Apple “Mac vs. PC” campaign, the brand ran companion ads with “PC” in the lower unit, looking up at “Mac” in the leaderboard unit. The PC ad block was filled with text, while the Mac unit was bare, relaying Apple’s core brand message of simplicity in a subtle yet powerful way. A political campaign could easily use this same strategy to highlight the differences between different candidates or disparate policies.

This campaign season, combine your team’s tried and true political know-how with the most cutting-edge advertising strategies available. Most of all, don’t hesitate to employ the help of an expert—or better yet, a team of experts! We’ve worked with hundreds of political campaigns at all levels, and would be happy to help your team optimize your campaign—reach out to our solutions team at any time for a free campaign consultation.

viewServices